HillRunner.com Blogs

Starting a running blog
by on Wednesday, April 3, 2013  (17 comments)

Yes, I have been drinking tonight and that has spurred my desire to start a running blog. I would never do this out in the blogosphere as I just don't think I have thick enough skin to take some of the negativity or drama that I sometimes see targeted at some of the bloggers I follow. I really don't want any of that in my life. As for the blog I just plan to post my weekly mileage and any random thoughts that I have about running or life in general. I am always trying to improve at both.

About my running; As of today I have 696 miles logged for 2013. Some were fast, many were slow, and a few 1k intervals were really fast. Way too many miles were on the treadmill due to the splendid ice accumulating conditions we had this year. I have a half marathon in May and I feel really good about where I am at right now in my training.

As for me; I am selectively compulsive and tend to take things to extremes but only about certain things like running, being on time, my shoes always being just right for my outfit, and clothes, shoes, and hair in general. Oddly though, I do not feel the same way about my running clothes and will wear them til they fall apart. I even raced a goal half marathon in a 5 year old dingy tech shirt with paint on the sleeve. When it comes to running it is all about the running and not at all about all those extra things that stylish runners need.

For a compulsive person though I do have a messy house. I just was not programmed to be tidy as much as I was programmed to get the miles in every day or shop for just the right pair of heels. A friend of mine told me that she cannot get out to exercise as she cannot bear to leave the house if there is a dirty dish in the sink. Entire kitchen can be trashed and I just see it as one more reason to leave for a run. You can always clean a kitchen to perfection even if the dishes were piled up by the sink for a week but your own body is not so forgiving if you do not work out. Not that I let my dishes pile up for a week. I learned long ago that the best cure for an untidy house is fewer possessions so I only have about a one day supply of dishes. And that last sentence is most likely the best advice I will ever offer on this blog.

My hobbies besides running are looking at red cowboy boots on E-Bay and trying to make sure that my kids grow up to be adults that are not annoying. Not that I am never ever annoying but you always hope for better for your children.

Quote this postQuote
17 comments
Ryan:

Charlene, it's good to have you on board. I've also considered starting a blog at other sites and never got around to it because of some of the pettiness out there. That's why I kept coming back here and trying to find a way and eventually just pulled the trigger, figuring the details will work themselves out. I've always done my best to foster an atmosphere of respect and civility here. Sure, we may have disagreements along the way but we can respectfully disagree and attempt to learn from those disagreements.

It sounds like you have been getting in some good work. This winter has definitely been challenging. I wonder how it might affect the local racing scene. Did people struggle through the winter, which might set them back this year compared to last, when there was no reason to struggle? Regardless, it sounds like you've handled it well. Nearly 700 miles in essentially 3 months is good work. I'm looking forward to seeing how this pays off for you this year.

As for the rest of your life, it sounds like a good balance to me. As you stated, you can always catch up on cleaning tomorrow as long as tomorrow doesn't become next week, then next month. We have to know where our priorities are.

Adults that are not annoying. I like that. I'm sure we're all annoying to some people sometimes. The trick is to be so to as few people as possible and as infrequently as possible. Of course, sometimes we have to annoy some people in order to do the right thing. In that case, being annoying can be good.

Quote this commentQuote
Ryan:

By the way, if you want to share you blog with any friends, you can with this link.

Anyone else can do essentially the same thing. Just find your name on a blog post you created or a comment you made and copy the link. That's your blogger profile page, which gives you a place to share some information about yourself and lists all your blog posts and your recent comments. Many updates to that page, as well as the rest of the blogging platform, are being planned.

Quote this commentQuote
Charlene:

I do feel like this website is a place of mutual respect and acceptance. Other sites seem to be primarily populated by jerks. Of course one always has to be cautious on the internet as people are excellent at triangulating and one time I did have a person on RWOL tell me that they had found my race photo from a particular race. Turns out they went thru 800 pictures and identified me by my red Brooks. Not that I go to great lengths to hide my identity but that was creepy.

My husband is a prime example of someone who is at times annoying to co- workers and me by always doing the right thing. This is a good thing though. I am primarily annoying when I drink too much but this is primarily annoying to my husband. What I do think though is that a lot of parents reinforce some very annoying behavior in their children that should be nipped in the bud.

Quote this commentQuote
Ryan:

I'm right with you on both accounts. I think I told you offline of my RWOL story. To not get too deep, when someone begins posting inappropriate content with an account that looks just like yours to the untrained eye and the moderators do nothing about it even after multiple requests, that's not a welcoming site. I'd never let this site do something like that. That's why I asked two others to help moderate. It helps ensure rapid response to any problems, even when I'm not immediately available.

As for annoying behavior, I think most people would know what you're talking about. Definitely something I also work on as a parent. I don't want to be the one with the always annoying child and I definitely don't want her to grow up to be the unnecessarily annoying adult.

Anyway, I'm glad to see you over here. It will be fun following what you share. You always have fun and interesting ways to look at things.

Quote this commentQuote
Ed:

I notice that non-runners and more specifically those that do not exercise in any manner, tend to find that us runners can be annoying. Simply talking about how great we feel after a run (without even mentioning that it was eight or ten miles) makes people feel lazy and therefore they perceive us as annoying. I try to notice those that find my running annoying and just avoid any hint of being a distance runner with them.

What is interesting is when the individuals that are so easily annoyed complain about how much I eat but never gain weight. I just smile and then hit them with the number of miles I am currently running that week. Then in my attempt to be extra annoying, I try to bait them into training for and running a 5K. Most co-workers join in with me and that stops the no-weight gain complaints.

Quote this commentQuote
Charlene:

I only talk about running with a few select people mostly because many non runners annoy me about the subject in ways too numerous to explain.

Quote this commentQuote
Ryan:
Ed: I notice that non-runners and more specifically those that do not exercise in any manner, tend to find that us runners can be annoying. Simply talking about how great we feel after a run (without even mentioning that it was eight or ten miles) makes people feel lazy and therefore they perceive us as annoying.



Non-runners will always find runners talking about running annoying. That's why I make a practice of not talking running to a non-runner unless they bring it up first. Even then, I find myself often just playing down the whole thing and looking for the first exit. I used to try to be a running evangelist but I just found it's not worth it. The level of friction isn't worth the very infrequent convert you get and those who are open to being converted will usually bring it up and make it clear they are actually interested anyway.

Quote this commentQuote
Diane:

Agree! I don't put anything on Facebook about my running b/c it just invites jealousy or annoyance. I hate when DM'ers post their runs on FB. It's like, enough already. We have a whole running website for that. If I want to comment on your DM run I don't want your FB (or my FB) friends knowing about it. If people are REALLY interested, they'll ask.

Quote this commentQuote
Charlene:

I share some about running on FB because quite of a few of my friends do want to hear about my running. So many times people tell me in person that they really enjoy these updates. Many of these are non runners. I only post about a really good workout,a goal race, or something really weird or funny that happened on my run but I spare them the annoying stuff that other people share on FB or blogs. Esp all those stupid FB pictures with the inspirational or "pat me on the back" message. Anyone that is annoyed that I had an awesome race can unfriend me. I have a pretty good idea of who my haters are and the sad thing is that they are fellow female runners with a slightly different mindset about running than I do.

Quote this commentQuote
Charlene:

Do any of you ever have to struggle not to give advice or an opinion when others post their workouts on FB? I am no running expert but I know that it is not a good idea to try to set a half marathon PR every single week during a long run or to attempt a BQ when the projected time based off a tune up race is 20 mins slower. I like to be supportive but I have learned that most people have to learn things on their own. I figure that unsolicited advice can come across as mean spirited or annoying but I cringe as everyone else tells them to go for their dreams and keep it up. In both examples I gave the person went on to crash and burn during their marathon or got injured.

Quote this commentQuote
Ryan:

I have mixed feelings about sharing running things on a place like FB. A lot of my running friends are on FB and not DM. I would say I know about half of my FB friends as runners. So I do share running experiences there but only race results and particularly noteworthy running stories. If my FB friends wanted more than that, I figure they would be on DM and find me.

As for giving advice on FB, running or otherwise, I've found it usually backfires on you. It just doesn't go well. Most people are looking for confirmation/cheerleading, not honest advice.

Quote this commentQuote
Andrew A.:
Ryan: As for giving advice on FB, running or otherwise, I've found it usually backfires on you. It just doesn't go well. Most people are looking for confirmation/cheerleading, not honest advice.

That is 'Mericuh, our immature society that has a high tendency of surrounding ourselves with a firm and thick comfort zone. We have iPods filled with music we already know and enjoy, we construct news/facebook/twitter feeds to deliver views that confirm and conform to our own set views, we live in communities that reinforce our tastes. Ideas that truly challenge how we train, think, live are to be avoided because they cause discomfort. It is a human, tribalistic tendency and I include myself in this indictment. I at least recognize it and, with a yen for growth, do strive to routinely expose myself to concepts and ways that challenge my perceptions and often lead me to reformulate my view. Not that I am great at it but it is something I routinely think about. A chorus of 'yes men' can lead to stagnation and complacency, poor choices and cyclical behavior.

Quote this commentQuote
Andrew A.:

And for Charlene, one of my favorite songs: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPPtrqvHGEg

Quote this commentQuote
Ryan:

I don't think we can say it's just this nation but it definitely happens frequently here. I don't think I go as far as you but I do like to challenge myself and move out of my comfort zone. It's healthy and it makes life interesting.

Quote this commentQuote
Andrew A.:
Ryan: I don't think we can say it's just this nation but it definitely happens frequently here.

We haven't, as I recognized that it is "a human, tribalistic tendency." To wit, it is a trait that can often be found among any critical mass of humans (nations, communities, organizations). I will only point out what I am most familiar with, however, and it seems key to clean up our own house before going around criticizing those of others.

I do like to challenge myself and move out of my comfort zone. It's healthy and it makes life interesting.

Yes, how firm can one's convictions really be if you are not willing to routinely challenge them and even be willing to openly entertain new evidence and alter them if that evidence makes sense?

Quote this commentQuote
Ryan:

Agree on both accounts. Always challenge yourself and get your own house in order before you even consider worrying about someone else.

Quote this commentQuote
Charlene:

“The one who follows the crowd will usually get no further than the crowd. The one who walks alone, is likely to find himself in places no one has ever been.”
— Albert Einstein

I do find that when I take a bit of advice from a knowledgeable source that it usually leads to good things. Sometimes though it can be a bit rough as the truth can hurt. Esp if it is something that you poured your heart and soul into. I have faults that I know that I need to improve upon to become a better runner, mother, or person but other faults I have grown to like. I decided it was society that decided those particular faults were a bad thing and I am not so sure that society is right.

Quote this commentQuote




Web HillRunner.com
All contents of this site ©1999-2014 HillRunner.com