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Running by effort
by on Wednesday, April 10, 2013  (3 comments)

I think I sometimes drive the runners I coach crazy talking about efforts. Easy, 10K effort, 5K effort, half marathon effort. These are common phrases in discussions.

Just this past week, I've had discussions with three runners I coach on what exactly these efforts mean and/or why I prefer training by effort over other methods, such as pace. I may explore this topic further in a future post but I'd like to share some high level thoughts on a few key points that I believe make training by effort the best way to train.

1) Training by effort helps you learn the correct effort to run a race at. You're going to make a few mistakes when learning a new skill like running by effort. Would you rather make those mistakes and learn from them in a workout or in a race? Why is this skill important in racing? Read on...

2) Training and racing by effort allows you to adjust for variables on the fly. Once you've honed your skill to run by effort, you will naturally adjust for things like adverse (or more ideal than expected) weather conditions, course related factors such as hills or even factors such as the lack of sleep you got last night or the stress of a bad day at work. Running simply by pace won't account for these factors and will leave you running a less than optimal pace/effort level. Running by heart rate may help you with some of these factors but it won't do much when your legs are fatigued because you helped your friend move yesterday. Also, your heart rate doesn't always respond to all stresses in an expected way and doesn't always respond to your effort level instantly. If you fine tune your ability to feel your effort, you can know instantly when your effort level changes. Relying on heart rate may leave a delayed response. You'll find out before disaster strikes but will you find out in time to adjust for an optimal performance?

3) Running by effort ensures you're doing the workout you intend to do. When trying to stimulate a physiological response from our training, we need to hit a certain effort level. Depending on some of the factors mentioned above (weather, course factors, life factors leading to more or less stress than usual) a given pace may be too fast or too slow to best target the training stimulus we want to focus on. If you're doing a workout that should target 5K pace/effort but you take the workout to the hills, you have to back off your pace. How much? Every hill is different. It's hard to tell without going by effort.

4) Running by effort removes your succeptibility to technological glitches. Just last week, I had a run where my Garmin flaked out. It had me starting far from where I actually did start and reported a first mile of 3:31. No problem. I wasn't relying on it so I just ignored it and figured it was just a stopwatch for that run. What if I was relying on it to set my pace? Would I have been lost until it locked into my location? What if this happened on race day and I was relying on it to set my race pace?

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3 comments
Ed:

Talk about a learning curve. I had 4 x 1 minute on a slight uphill at 5K effort. The first minute was at 10.1 miles per hour too fast (that is what I hope to race the 5K in May), I tried to dial it back for the second minute and I hit 9.6 much better, the third 10.6 - what happened?, dialed back again, 10.1, not dialed back enough but better than 10.6. It will take me some time to learn the feel of effort versus pace.

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Ryan:

Ed, fortunately I kind of expected this so I purposely gave you a workout that you could overshoot some without harm. Consider it a learning experience.

Someone else had a workout today including some marathon effort miles. Over shot a bit but was close. For both of you, it's a learning experience. You're learning that 5K effort in the first few minutes isn't nearly as intense as we sometimes think of it, he's learning just how easy the early miles of a marathon need to be. We want to learn these things in workouts, not races, right?

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Ryan:

Someone just sent me this link, asking me if I was copying Burfoot.

Honestly, I didn't see his post until now but, needless to say, I agree with him.

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