Monthly Update
by on Tuesday, June 30, 2015  (11 comments)

Instead of a daily or weekly blog post I will do a monthly update instead.

After all that time off from running I am finally getting back into good shape. I started running again on 03/10/2015 and here is a simple breakdown of each month through the end of June.

March - 16 runs - 39.66 miles - 2.48 miles per run (average) - 5 hours 17 minutes - 7:59 average pace per mile

April - 26 runs - 113.79 miles - 4.38 miles per run (average) - 14 hours 34 minutes total - 7:41 average pace per mile

May - 24 runs - 129.46 miles - 5.39 miles per run (average) - 16 hours 9 minutes total - 7:33 average pace per mile

June - 28 runs - 186.8 miles - 6.67 miles per run (average) 22 hours 56 minutes total - 7:22 average pace per mile

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11 comments
cesar

Congrats Ed!! Your progression has been pretty nicely!! That Ryan is a killer!! He is ordering you to run almost everyday!! Good job and keep up the great work!!

Slow it down a little!!

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Ed

Thanks Cesar. As long as the paces feel good I will keep them there - I am paying close attention to how I feel before, during and after each run as well as throughout the day and week. If I notice any issues I will slow it down - trust me - I want to take things as close to the limits of my training capacity without going over.

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Ryan

Ed, you know I like to get on you about the paces of your easy runs. Remember, it's better to be at 90% of capacity or even 80% and keep training consistently than to end up at 100% but spend time sitting on the sideline injured.

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cesar

Ryan,

When you have a new runner you work with him starting running 3-4 times per week and keep it there if the individual wishes that or you try to get up that level to 6-7 runs per week.

I saw that with Ed you started with very short runs but kept the frecuency at 5-7 runs per week.

Do you believe that a runner can reach the full potential running 6-7 times per week?, of course I am talking on days here because most of us run only singles.

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cesar

Ryan,

When you have a new runner you work with him starting running 3-4 times per week and keep it there if the individual wishes that or you try to get up that level to 6-7 runs per week.

I saw that with Ed you started with very short runs but kept the frecuency at 5-7 runs per week.

Do you believe that a runner can reach the full potential running 6-7 times per week?, of course I am talking on days here because most of us run only singles.

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cesar

Ryan,

When you have a new runner you work with him starting running 3-4 times per week and keep it there if the individual wishes that or you try to get up that level to 6-7 runs per week.

I saw that with Ed you started with very short runs but kept the frecuency at 5-7 runs per week.

Do you believe that a runner can reach the full potential running 6-7 times per week?, of course I am talking on days here because most of us run only singles.

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cesar

Ryan,

When you have a new runner you work with him starting running 3-4 times per week and keep it there if the individual wishes that or you try to get up that level to 6-7 runs per week.

I saw that with Ed you started with very short runs but kept the frecuency at 5-7 runs per week.

Do you believe that a runner can reach the full potential running 6-7 times per week?, of course I am talking on days here because most of us run only singles.

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cesar

Ryan,

When you have a new runner you work with him starting running 3-4 times per week and keep it there if the individual wishes that or you try to get up that level to 6-7 runs per week.

I saw that with Ed you started with very short runs but kept the frecuency at 5-7 runs per week.

Do you believe that a runner can reach the full potential running 6-7 times per week?, of course I am talking on days here because most of us run only singles.

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Ryan

Cesar,

It all depends on the runner. Depending on the runner's commitments out of running and goals within running, we come to a decision about how many days per week the runner can get in. Then I try to get the runner to that number of runs as quickly as reasonable.

I've found that it's best to establish the routine as quickly as can safely be done. If you want to run 1 hour a day 6-7 days a week, get to 6-7 days a week first, then build up your run duration to 1 hour. I've found that works better for two reasons:

1) You get into the routine. Once you've settled into a routine of 6-7 days a week running, it's not too hard to maintain. If you settle into 3-4 days a week running, it can be harder to add in more days.

2) It's easier to add distance to runs than it is to add runs to the schedule. I think this is mostly psychological but, if you're running 4 runs a week of an hour each, it's hard to add a 5th run. Most people don't feel right adding a 20 minute run to the schedule, which is what I would prefer, and adding another hour-long run is an instant increase in volume of 25% over the prior level. If you're running 6 runs a week of 40 minutes each, it's not a big deal to add 10 minutes to one of those runs and 5 minutes to two others. That progression comes very naturally. Both would get you to the same place, a 20 minute increase in weekly running, but one seems to come with much less resistance.

As for what it takes for a runner to reach full potential, again, a lot depends on the runner. If you're just out of college and competed collegiately, chances are your training capacity is much higher than an "adult onset" runner who is 45 years old with a full time job and a family and a very short training history. The recent college grad might need 13 runs a week to maximize potential. The middle aged adult onset runner may not currently be ready to handle more than 4-5 runs a week. You can't reach your full potential if you train beyond your current capacity and end up injured or burned out.

Interesting topic. I'm going to mark this down as a topic to consider exploring in a future blog post.

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cesar

Thanks Ryan!! I am glad that I motivated you to write a blog post!!

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Ed

Ryan, I am being hyper vigilant about listening to my body right now. I feel that I could be going faster but I will not test that out - plus I know that wouldn't be sustainable. I keep thinking that my paces will drop as we add mileage but they are not dropping and I seem to be handling it very well. My legs feel pretty good everyday.

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