Recent Posts in Roundups
Running, your heart, and your bones
by on Thursday, July 27, 2017

We all know by now that running is good for us, right? Well, how good is it for us? Some of us may have heard that runners have higher levels of coronary artery plaques. Is this a concern? It would seem to be. As for the bones, we know running strengthens them. How much running does it take, though?

Running and your heart

Is it true that runners have more coronary artery plaques than non-runners? In short, yes. Is this a concern? The obvious answer would be yes. However, things seem to be a little more complicated. The kinds of plaques runners have are more stable and less likely to break loose and clog an artery.

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Please lay off the NSAIDs
by on Thursday, July 6, 2017

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For as long as I can remember, taking some form of NSAID was a popular thing with runners. An ibuprofen late in a marathon to dull the pain or as an anti-inflammatory after a run was pretty much a given. I even admit that, before I knew better, I'd at least occasionally take some ibuprofen, thinking the anti-inflammatory affects might help me recover from races faster.

Some time during my college years, I read an article about anti-inflammatories and how harmful they can be to the kidneys. This article featured a runner who died from kidney failure and, as I recall, included the words of at least a couple medical professionals who explained how harmful ibuprofen and, really, all NSAIDs can be to the kidneys. I went off ibuprofen cold turkey after reading that article.

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Fitness and your health, who needs to be gluten free?
by on Thursday, June 29, 2017

Fitness and your health

You know that your running is good for your health, right? But how good? Is it better to be naturally fit or to train hard? I think a lot of us have believed or maybe hoped that how hard you worked at it would be more important.

Unfortunately:

What this tells us is that exercise is good for you because it increases your cardiovascular fitness. High fitness, meanwhile, is good for you no matter how you acquire it—which is a lucky break for those who happen to have high levels of baseline fitness thanks to their genetics.
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Pre-race stress and yogurt better than milk?
by on Thursday, May 25, 2017

We all know that pre-race stress is not good for our race performances. But why? Well, there are a lot of reasons. We now have another.

We all also know that calcium is important for our bones and dairy is a good source of milk. But what if one type of dairy is better than others?

Pre-race stress

You already know to avoid pre-race stress because it's not good for your race performance, right? You might even know some of the reasons it isn't good, right?

Well, here's another way:

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Beet juice for well trained athletes? How much does running extend your life?
by on Thursday, April 27, 2017

A couple interesting posts on topics we've discussed before. One on a new study that found a surprising result and another to quantify what we've known.

Beet juice

We've already covered beet juice and its apparent ability to help untrained athletes. Unfortunately, it didn't seem to help trained athletes (or, in the case of the second link, only untrained athletes were studied).

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Sleep matters and building muscle
by on Thursday, March 30, 2017

Sleep matters

How important is sleep? Really important.

In this study, cyclists were either allowed normal sleep (about 7.5 hours) or kept sleep deprived (about 4 hours) after a workout.

The result? Sleep deprived cyclists were sleepier (shocker!) and less motivated to train. In addition, their blood pressure had not recovered as much as those who were allowed normal sleep, suggesting less complete recovery from the workout.

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There are no non-responders, how to cool in hot weather races
by on Thursday, February 23, 2017

There are no non-responders

We've all seen those people. Maybe some of us are those people. It seems like they work so hard and they just don't respond to the training. They just don't get more fit. It's so frustrating to see that person who works hard and doesn't get results. What do you tell that person?

Well, maybe it's not the answer we want but it looks like the answer may be step up your training.

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Motivation and injury, in competition fueling strategies
by on Thursday, February 2, 2017

I'm feeling a little under the weather and low on energy this week so, instead of a regular weekly post, I'm going back into my archives to find some research that I never got to post in a monthly recap post. There are some good ones out there, here are a couple that jumped out at me.

Motivation and injury

You're heading into a race. You have a goal that you set for yourself and you're highly motivated to get that goal. Does this make you more or less likely to get injured on race day? Before reading this study, I could have guessed you might be more susceptible. If you're motivated to get your goal, you might push through some things you wouldn't with less motivation.

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LCHF charts, stress fracture warning signs
by on Thursday, January 26, 2017

LCHF charts

I've written about low carb, high fat (LCHF) diets previously (see here and here for examples of what I've written before, there may be more). However, people still question me about this. Can't you teach your body to burn enough fat to never have to worry about running out of fuel.

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A sub-2 hour marathon in 2017?
by on Thursday, December 29, 2016

A bit of a different post this month. Earlier this month, Nike announced that they will be fielding an attempt to break 2 hours in the marathon in the spring of 2017. Shortly later, Adidas announced that they had a similar initiative in the works. Both have apparently been working on this for years.

I've written about breaking 2 hours in the marathon in the past when the topic has come up. In 2014, I said don't expect to see a 1:59 in the next decade (by 2024) and I'm not even convinced it would happen in the next 20 years (by 2034). So am I writing this off as something that never will happen? Well, not completely. Here's why.

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